Thursday, April 21, 2011

Lily Growing Tips



Lilies come in a variety of colors and sizes.  There are border lilies that are mid-sized that may be grown along a walkway or encircling a tree.  

Then there are the smaller lilies; Stella d’Oro or happy returns that look good grown in the front of the garden. In the back or in the center grow  Asiatic, Orientals and daylilies which are the tall.  


These lilies will add interest and height to your flower garden.  

If you want to add an exotic appeal to your yard and garden then grow tiger lilies.  The lily is a summer blooming flower that will produce flowers in July and August.   The photo card bellow is of my garden. 



Growing Lilies
Lilies are easy to grow. Plant the lily bulbs in the fall.  Nursery grown lilies are planted in spring after the danger of frost has past.  

Grow lilies in full sun to part sun in well-drained acidic soil. If you have extremely hot summers then lilies will welcome partial shade.  My summers are hot with temperatures soaring into the 100’s.   

My lilies have four hours of morning sun, four hours of partial shade in the afternoon and four hours of late afternoon sun.  I shelter them from the peak heat and they are healthy. 


Planting Lilies
Clear your garden site by removing grass, weeds and rocks.  Loosen the soil to sixteen inches deep.  Dig a hole that is six inches deep.  Add some bonemeal and then set the fat flat end of the lily in the center of the hole the slightly pointy side should face up. 




Back fill the hole with the remaining soil and water the lilies well.  For multiple planting of lilies space your lilies 12 to 18  inches apart.





Tips
When lilies are above the ground apply mulch around them to help to maintain moisture and to discourage weed growth.
In autumn cut your lilies back.
Then add three inches of mulch on top of the lilies this will protect them throughout winter.


 Here are some tips on growing Asiatic lilies in a container: 

      

      Thursday, April 14, 2011

      Container Herb Garden

      A herb garden that is grown in a container has many features as it allows you to transport your herbs outside during the summer and to bring them back inside when weather turns cold.  A container garden is also a good choice for the person who has limited space. If you have a small yard or if you live in an apartment that has a sunny balcony a container garden is all you need.


      You can grow herbs in any type of container as herbs are not picky and will grow well in clay pots, windows boxes, wheelbarrow, terracotta or a chimney or even a vintage tin container.  Search for unique containers at garage sales, estate sales and flea markets. The possibilities are endless when it comes to planting herb container gardens.

      A few years ago I had a client that collected vintage bathtubs, baby beds, mailboxes and bicycles.  She had them lying in her gardens as features.  I convinced her to allow me to use them as containers and to grow herbs in them.  I moved the bathtub close to her pond and planted lavender in it.  The vintage iron baby bed held an assortment herbs; sweet basil, sage, lemon balm, thyme, with creeping rosemary growing off the sides.  I moved the iron bed close to the patio area and set up a solar spot light to highlight the herb arrangement at night.  My client was thrilled with the herb container gardens.  

      When it comes to growing herbs in containers I would suggest that you use what you have  anything that will hold soil and  allows the herb comfortable growing space will work, provided that you have water drainage holes at the bottom of the container.
      image by freerangestock.com

      When you are ready to plant your herb container garden choose a combination of herbs that suit your needs. If you like to cook you may want to grow culinary herbs, if you like to make soaps, potpourri or natural mosquito repellents you would want to grow fragrant herbs and if you like to heal your body naturally you would grow medicinal herbs.  You can grow herbs easily from seeds or from a nursery grown plant. 

      View this You Tube video to learn more about herb container gardening.